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Coral overgrowth

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dbboy17 View Drop Down
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    Posted: September 16 2015 at 7:02am
I've slowly been trying to transition my tank from a fish only to fish with corals for a while now.  I will get some corals that will only last a few months and then I have others that grow like weeds.  I wish I knew the secret why some die off and others thrive.  My post is about how to manage the corals that grow like weeds though.  I have some Colt coral and Green Ricordia that are everywhere in my tank.  I am very inexperienced too when it comes to fragging corals.  I'm wanting to make room to place other types of corals in my tank but need to deal with the Colt and Ricordia first.  I'll try to add some pics when the lights turn on so you can visualize what I'm talking about.  Would a LFS give decent trade in values for large pieces of these, or is it better to try and trade them on here?     
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 1stupidpunk Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 16 2015 at 8:24am

Colt corals will often let go of a shoot and can spread across the tank....try moving it to an area with a bit less flow. The demand for colt corals is very low compared to demand for SPS corals so they don't fetch a huge price.

Ricordia corals are hit or miss on pricing, some of the less common colors can go for higher but most of the greens/tans wont sell for much.

Most LFS wont pay much(actually they wont pay at all but will offer store credit) for your corals as they buy them from their vendors. I would take a few pics and post them here on the forums. Many of us don't have tons of cash available but are willing to do trades for corals.

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dbboy17 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dbboy17 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 16 2015 at 2:12pm
Here is a pic of my tank.  As you can see there is quite a bit of overgrowth of the Colt coral and the Ricoridia.  The clowns have hosted with the ricordia so don't really want to take all of it out.  Just want to make room for different corals in the tank. 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bstuver Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 16 2015 at 7:05pm
Can't tell for sure as I am on my phone but those look like hairy mushrooms.
Jackie Stuver

"wait these aren't the happy Hawaiians oompa doompa godly heaven on your face zoas?   I dont want them then. lol!" Ksmart
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Mark Peterson View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mark Peterson Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 19 2015 at 8:52am
I agree with Jackie. 

I also see an abundance of Kenya Tree Coral(Capnella sp.) rather than Colt Coral(Klyxum sp.). Kenya Tree grows like a weed in most tanks so we often see it being given away for free because it is so prolific, Sorry.Unhappy It self propagates by pinching off branches that float around until they attach wherever they happen to land. Fragging is easy. Use a sharp scissors to cut it off and an elastic to hold it into a depression in another rock until it attaches. Usually takes 3-10 days.

Colt Coral is much less common in the hobby because it is less hardy. It does not self propagate and does not easily attach to other rocks. See the pic below. One way to know the difference is that Colt Coral shrinks it's polyps right into the stalks so they almost completely disappear whereas Kenya Tree polyps shrink up to look like tiny pine cones.

If that tank were mine and I wanted to increase the diversity, I'd first test the Alk, Ca and Mg levels and ensure they were within range. Then I would simply remove and sell rocks with the Kenya and Mushrooms to be replaced with new rock and coral. 

Aloha,
Mark  Hug

P.S. I have a question about the plumbing, if you don't mind. The Locline returns are pretty deep in the tank. How do you keep the sump from overflowing when the main pump goes OFF?
An easy fix and really the best fix is to adjust the nozzles so they are into the water just 1/2". Then, when the power goes out the water siphon will break when the nozzles almost immediately start sucking air. No need for failure prone holes drilled in the Locline or cumbersome anti-backflow valves in the plumbing. Smile





Edited by Mark Peterson - September 19 2015 at 9:20am
Reefkeeping Tips, & quick, easy setup tricks:
www.utahreefs.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=9244
Pay it forward - become a paid WMAS member
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Mark Peterson View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mark Peterson Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 19 2015 at 9:15am
Oh, regarding why some coral don't do so well in an aquarium. There are several considerations:
1. When one or two types of coral dominate the tank, their territorial toxins(allelopathic chemicals) inhibit and in sufficient concentration will slowly kill other coral/animals.
2. Activated Carbon adsorbs toxins. Place it loosely in a media bag in an area of good flow, like next to the main pump intake screen, readjust/flip the bag over weekly and replace it monthly.
3. Water changes help dilute territorial toxins. 10% monthly water changes are typically sufficient.
4. After Salinity and Temperature, Alk(Alkalinity), Ca(Calcium), and Mg(Magnesium) are the three most important components of healthy seawater. Testing these and keeping them within range are critical to coral health. It's part of the fun of reefkeeping to do these chemistry things. Smile
5. Sometimes, after all is said and done, an individual coral or a species of coral may just not do well in a particular tank where everything else is doing fine. Xenia is one of these that grows like a weed in some tanks but disappears when placed in another tank.

Aloha,
Mark  Hug

P.S.
Of course, Butterflyfish eat some types of coral and beneficial worms so we might see a hobbyist buy coral to feed the Butterfly. Wink


Edited by Mark Peterson - September 19 2015 at 9:28am
Reefkeeping Tips, & quick, easy setup tricks:
www.utahreefs.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=9244
Pay it forward - become a paid WMAS member
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