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What kind of algae is this?

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Mark Peterson View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mark Peterson Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 11 2015 at 6:52pm
Only slightly toxic if they eat it, and the amount of Dinoflagellates in that tank was certainly not enough that it would have killed any snails. Also they don't eat what they don't like. 

You know there are two LFS closer to us in the valley that sell snails and hermits for 50-75 cents each, right? Very little loss of life when you can see the animals you're buying.

Happy reefing

Aloha,
Mark  Hug
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Chevmaro Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 13 2015 at 9:03am
I’m not convinced this problem is going to go away any time soon.  I think I did not cure the rocks properly before introduced to the tank.  I rinsed them off with a hose, high pressure nozzle and ran RO water through them for a few days.  I think I could have cured them more thoroughly before adding to the tank.  I’m considering a reboot but I’m not sure the best way to go about it.

What is the best way to reboot this tank?

Should I wait this out or start over?  I’m only 3 months in.  I think it would be better to figure this out now before it is harder to fix later.

 

Thoughts? 

 

And thanks for your input Mark, you have always been helpful.  It has been a long time since I started a tank and just getting back into it, doing a lot of reading, I am convinced I did it wrong.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mark Peterson Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 14 2015 at 8:34am
Smile As mentioned in my first reply in this thread, a media called Poly-Filter can be used to clear up the issues -OR- as you just inferred, swapping out most of the dead rock for good Live Rock from a mature tank would be the other course of action. 

I wrote these two Reefkeeping Tips specifically for this kind of situation(copied and pasted here from the thread of Reefkeeping Tips and the Affordable Aquarium):

Can I use the dry rock and sand that came with this aquarium?http://www.utahreefs.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=41514

Best treatment of dry rock before re-use: http://utahreefs.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=74744

Aloha,
Mark  Hug

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ReefdUp Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 18 2015 at 7:46pm
Sorry...that does not look like dino's to me, and I've seen more than my fair share (microscope confirmation).

The photo looks like cyano in a new tank with a weird light spectrum or photoperiod. Cyano can easily get whispy, bubbly, and a variety of colors. Dinos are more snot-like masses in most cases. Yours looks more slimy (very technical terms I know). Basically, dinos have more of a massive structure while cyano lacks structure...in most cases.

Then there's statistics. This is a newer tank with immature rock. The cases of getting dinos in that short of time are incredibly small. It's more likely cyano just statistically speaking.

Regular doses of a good bacteria will help the tank cycle along if you used immature rock. Good lighting, good water, proper food, and good flow will help prevent it.

If it was dinos, boosting the pH above 8.4 and holding steady for weeks usually knocks it out. However, this is not recommended unless you are absolutely sure. Bacteria or algae won't outcompete dinos, and low nutrients won't starve it. Lots of studies exist on this.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mark Peterson Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 19 2015 at 9:14am
Question What many of us have traditionally believed is Dinoflagellates, as in this pic below, is really just a form of Cyanobacteria?



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Fishbot Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 23 2016 at 7:06pm
You need time for the biological milleu to establish itself and no amount of doing anything on your part other than waiting is going to amount to much.

But since you must do something go ahead and add more snails. 2 per gallon at least (you dont have an algea problem you have a snail problem). They might not eat that particular algea but the constant grazing won't leave it anywhere to attach.

Add a poly filter, as Mark suggested.

A focus on growing macro algea is also critical in the first year. Prolifera or racemosa outperform cheato.

As for Fishbot, I am glad that someone can manage to be perceived as a bigger dick than me. --Dion
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Chevmaro Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 22 2016 at 3:04pm
Sorry, some late replies here.  But just to inform those who might be searching.

This algae that I really believed to be dino, may or may not have been.  The cure was indeed poly filter.  After adding the poly filter it started to go away and was completely gone within 2 weeks.  I thought I was all good, took out the poly filter when it was exhausted and it came back about a month later.  Ran poly filter again, and again it was gone in 2 weeks.  Still running poly filter and no more trouble.

Pretty sure it was because of the immature rock, but now that immature rock is starting to grow some coraline and looking much better.

Thanks for everybody's help.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mark Peterson Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 23 2016 at 8:59pm

Wonderful news.

Many, many thanks for the update. We don't often hear back from people about what worked for them.

Aloha,

Mark  Hug

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