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Mark Peterson View Drop Down
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    Posted: August 13 2017 at 10:40pm
A word to the wise. Smile
It's important to realize that the statistics are that most hobbyists have been in the hobby for 2 years or less. Others may have had more than 2 years but only kept one or two tanks during that time. The internet can be a source of good information but it is also full of people that show us how to repeat the same mistakes everyone else is making. Wink Popular vote is not the best way to identify the truth.

Some of the smartest and most successful hobbyists I have ever known took the time to find 2 or 3 "old-timer" hobbyists that had been around the block more than a few times. These smart people would, ahead of their tank setup, ask the same questions of each of those 2-3 experienced hobbyists and then combine the responses to come up with solutions that best met their situation. 

Aloha,
Mark  Hug
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote knowen87 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 13 2017 at 7:42pm
I like to look at the forums to when I need inspiration on set up. We have tank threads on this site, you might find someone that had done a similar project to what you would like to do. If you need some more inspiration I will often go to reed central or reeftoreef and look at the tank build threads there as well. As far as advice for what you should get I would make sure to have and RODI filter, especially if you are getting a larger tank. You will need some (or multiple) forms of nutrient export (ie. refugium, skimmer, nitrate reactor, carbon dosing). I would also recommend taking your time. Find some tanks that you like and try to emulate their setup and maintenance practices. There is a lot of talent locally and lots of reefers that love to show off their tanks. sometimes you just have to ask.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote startreefover Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 12 2017 at 5:19am
Thank you all for your help. I have never done larger than a 40 gallon tank. Any advice on setting up a larger tank like this? And planning it out? Any equipment you would recommend? Thanks for all your help.
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Mark Peterson View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mark Peterson Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 08 2017 at 1:54pm
I too like glass because it doesn't scratch as easily, but I love Acrylic tanks for a some very good reasons:
1. Scratches can be removed without too much trouble using strong magnetic algae scrapers and micromesh sandpaper;
2. Acrylic looks clearer than glass, almost as if you could reach over and touch the water; and
3. Acrylic is lighter weight, easier to transport and easier to install.

It's not so much the size of the tank, but rather the environment that is provided in the space available. Hobbyists don't have to follow the crowd. They can think outside the box. Some hobbyists might criticize me for keeping a Yellow Tang in a tank 36" long, 4.5" deep, 20" tall. Yes, it's less than 5 inches deep (front to back). Yet from my viewpoint, I would criticize hobbyists that don't provide their Tang with a healthy environment with plenty of live algae, supplemental lettuce, algae in frozen foods, etc..



Aloha,
Mark  Hug
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote knowen87 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 08 2017 at 10:16am
Glass for sure. Acrylic will drive you crazy. Sailfins will get big. Im not sure I would go for a minimum although I have had one smaller tanks he was never larger than 4 inches. I think a 180 is a great tank. It is 2x2x6 which I think is a good ratio. It also provides 6' of swimming room. 
If you are worried about cost, just don't stock the tank as heavily. Less fish requires less maintenance, less rock, etc. 
Finally, get the red sea sailfin. The color patters are way more vibrant. I would also get one that is a little larger because I am not as big a fan of the yellow juvenile patterns. But that is just me. 


Edited by knowen87 - August 08 2017 at 10:17am
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phys View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote phys Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 08 2017 at 2:20am
In my experience, having a longer tank is better than a taller one as it gives the fish more room to cruise. 150 would be the minimum I would suggest if you want to keep it for a long time. I would suggest larger if you can though. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mark Peterson Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 07 2017 at 10:31pm

It's not easy to see in the pic but there was algae growing on these rocks that Convict, Yellow and Sailfin Tangs kept mowed down. Notice how robust(thick) this Sailfin was. 

This pic shows how fat a healthy tang can be, grazing on algae.



The Caulerpa in this tank was allowed to grow thick without any herbivorous fish, until a Sailfin was added.  

The pic below was about 8 months later. By then the Caulerpa was completely eaten.


Most hobbyists don't consider placing their reef aquarium in the sun, but I have to say, it's amazing what the sun does for a reef. Herbivores love it, coral and so many different organisms look and grow amazing with some sun. The only caution is to make sure it's not direct sun all day long.

The three pics above are the same 75 gal tank, only one of many tanks that I have placed in the window over the years.

Below is another, placed in an east facing picture window.
This 75 gal was home to three, Shocked yes 3, fairly large herbivorous fish;
a Yellow Tang, a Purple Tang and a Scribbled Rabbitfish.


Aloha,
Mark  Hug
Reefkeeping Tips, & quick, easy setup tricks:
www.utahreefs.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=9244
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Mark Peterson View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mark Peterson Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 07 2017 at 3:58pm
Sure, a huge tank is good but they can do fine in 75 gal tanks. One special key to keeping Tangs happy and healthy is to grow algae in the display for them to graze on. Tangs are like cattle. They need to be able to graze all day. They need to be fat. The grazing is not just for eating the algae, it's also an activity that is in their genes. It seems to make them happy.

There are cool looking algae that can be grown in the display for a few months prior to introducing the Tangs. Eventually the algae gets pretty much decimated, but by then the Tangs should have gotten accustomed to eating Romaine and Greenleaf lettuce as well as a little bit of Nori now and then. I'll add a picture of this later

Sailfin Tangs don't bother fish at all, even small ones, but they do need to be trained to get along with other similar body shape Tangs. The way to train fish is described in a topic listed in the Reefkeeping Tips linked below in my signature line.

Aloha,
Mark.
Reefkeeping Tips, & quick, easy setup tricks:
www.utahreefs.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=9244
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hogie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 07 2017 at 9:45am
I would for sure go glass. You'll hate acrylic every time you have to clean it and acrylic scratches so dang easily. The best place place to get one for cheap is right here. I think last week I saw a 150 for $600 with stand.

Edited by Hogie - August 07 2017 at 9:46am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Reefer4Ever Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 06 2017 at 11:47pm
Bob is spot on with getting as long of a tank as will fit. I would think a minimum of 5' but 6' or even 8' is best. Everything else Can Be worked in around the tank you get. Look forward to seeing this cone together.
90 gal reef w/refugium
24 gal softie tank
11 gal nano anemone tank
5 gal fresh water
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BobC63 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 06 2017 at 11:40pm
I would say 120 -150 gallon minimum size tank. 180g - 210g if you can swing that. Go for the longest length tank you can fit / afford; tangs like a lot of swimming room.

I would recommend glass w/ built in overflows ("Reef ready") so you can plumb in a sump to house all your equipment. A sump for aquariums of these sizes should hold a minimum of 35 - 40 gallons.

For cost savings, check not only the Buy / Sell Forum on here but also the ksl.com classifieds. Buying used will save you close to half over new cost.


- My Current Tank: 150g Mixed Reef -

* Marine & Reef tanks since 1977 *
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote startreefover Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 06 2017 at 11:10pm
Hello,

I am looking to get back into the hobby but want to go about it a little different this time. I am looking to go fairly large with my tank this time. Mostly I want a sailfin tang as my centerpiece and do not want anything too small for that fish. Then I want to decide where to go with the fish around it. I will add corals along the way as well.

Right now I am in the planning stage so please give me advice on the size of tank/sump that would be the minimum I should use for the sailfin tang. Any idea where I could get something that size for a good price as well? Also, do I do glass or acrylic?

Let's start there. I am planning to build a stand to save money and to make it our style. I have done that before so that is not an issue.

Thanks for your help.
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